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Matt Cappotelli Inspired Faith In Fellow Wrestler; Cappotelli’s 2006 Retirement Speech (VIDEO)

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More Andrade Almas and Zelina Vega, please

A very good video from the WWE show in Tokyo:

Sadly, these two haven’t had much opportunity to showcase how good/fun they are since being called up to the main roster, at least on television:

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Yes, it’s a marathon and not a sprint but after what he did closing out his run in NXT, it’s hard not to wish he was getting the chance to do the same on SmackDown right here and now. For the time being, we can only hope he continues getting some play on social media while creative works out what to do with him on television which will hopefully lead to his next five-star match.

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SSE UK Night 2 – Merch Heads Up

Just got back to the hotel in Milton Keynes ready to head to Manchester for night 2.

Heads up for anyone going, make sure you take cash (plenty of it too) with you.

Merch stands only took cash cash, no card. Cash machines at the venue emptied very quickly. Fans even emptied Morrison’s and others nearby so make sure you take cash with you.

Prices were £25 for a tshirt, £40 for hoodies.

Plenty of stuff, Bullet Club, Kenny’s white Change The World shirt, Osprey, Bone Soldier, Tokyo Pimps, event tshirts. Okada, LIJ to name a few.

Intermission had a lot of NJPW guys set up their own booths. Tiger Mask was happy to meet and greet people. Osprey chopped a few guys and lit up their chests.

Good times!

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Here’s WWE’s Top 10 on greatest announcer calls

I’m not sure I agree with anything on this list outside of number one, and even that may not be my pick for the top spot. But that’s why stuff like this works: you watch to see if you agree, knowing full well you won’t, and then rush to disagree. So, get on with disagreeing in the comments section below.


Past “Top Ten”/”Greatest ____” lists from WWE:

Greatest Crowd Reactions (Part one)
Greatest Crowd Reactions (Part two)
Greatest babyface turns
Greatest heel turns
Famous Firings
Funniest falls
Mic botches
Shocking returns
Most memorable debuts
Greatest slaps
Most surprising championship changes
Dramatic Royal Rumble endings
Funniest moments
Greatest insults
Biggest breakups
Fastest title changes
Ridiculous reversals
Finisher combinations
Defining TakeOver moments
Craziest kickouts
Most creative fan chants
Broken rings
Shane McMahon’s Insanity
Undertaker’s chokeslams
Chris Jericho attacks
WrestleMania’s Forgotten Celebs
Stars Kicked Out of Factions
Most Extreme WrestleMania Moments
Ringside Invasions
Outside-the-ring finishers
McMahon Family Showdowns
Anti-Superstar conspiracies
Tag Team Formations
Extreme Rules moments
Cold-blooded Superstar betrayals
Incredible Superstar reunions
Best catchphrases of the last decade
Moves that have beaten John Cena
Before they were famous
Best impersonations
Draft Day shockers
Strangest Battlegrounds
RKOs OUT OF NOWHERE
Impactful Raw debuts
Superstar pick-up lines
Superstar Weddings Gone Wrong
Extreme SummerSlam moments
Backstage meltdowns
John Cena World title wins
Career-threatening match moments
Rapid-fire finishing moves
Controversial Finishes
Goldberg Spears
Hell-ish Hell in a Cell moments
Masters of the Superkick
Wildest Powerbombs
Sneakiest Superstar disguises
Manhandled Managers
Survivor Series debuts
Raw vs. SmackDown battles
Superstars smashed through ladders
Most Dominant Returns
Superstars Getting Crushed on Cars
Announce table crash landings
Big Men Destroying Underdogs
Guest referees wrecking Superstars
Mirrored double-team maneuvers
Tests of strength
Finishing moves on the stage
Fastest eliminations in Royal Rumble history
Best Elimination Chamber matches
Announcer beatdowns
OMG Elimination Chamber moments
Superstars playing with fire
Brock Lesnar’s most shocking F5s
Backstage assaults
Superstars getting fired
Hardy Boyz ladder attacks
Hostile crowd reactions
Ring breakers
John Cena’s best verbal smackdowns
Guest referees getting wrecked
Great Shield moments
Incredible Royal Rumble match saves
Crazy Elimination Chamber jumps
Funniest WrestleMania moments
WrestleMania returns
WrestleMania endings
Epic Fails
Wildest Wedding Moments

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Anyone who went to night 1 of SSE what’s the policy for bringing bags/backpacks?

Travelling from Ireland tonight for the Manchester show, I'll probably have to bring my bag along with me. Nothing in it other than a phone charger and spare clothes. I know for OTT shows bags are fine but the will have to check them, just wondering if that's the same here?

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and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things · and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.'” While training under Cappotteli · “He never yelled · ” he said. After winning his first title · ” he tweeted. Due to a short career · ” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up · but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner ins · but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that · Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds. According to Moss · Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. Wit · Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who · Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would b · Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him t · he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian. As someone of faith · he was pretty nervous. Being older · he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that · he worried whether he’d find his place. And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli. Over the next few months in 2017 · he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his tra · it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves wit · Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38 · Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically · Moss learned the devastating news. “Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me · Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two. “He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood · never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.” Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside · one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.” As he continued to work more dates and shows · they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive. And while that isn’t always easy · they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught. It’s just another reason why wrestling is good. The post Wrestling is Goo · threw my dropkick · vulgar

Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon

Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38, but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner inspired him to become a church deacon.

When Dalton Moss attended Ohio Valley Wrestling’s beginners program as a 28-year-old, he was pretty nervous. Being older, he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that, he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian.

As someone of faith, he worried whether he’d find his place.

And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli.

Over the next few months in 2017, Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would be much more difficult.

Despite the prognosis, Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically, it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves with students. Adding, “He never yelled, never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.”

Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside the ring.  While we can all get caught up in small problems and consumed with negativity, Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds.

According to Moss, Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. With Cappotelli, Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two.

“He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood a lot for the younger guys,” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up, threw my dropkick, and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.’”

While training under Cappotteli, Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him that. Moss tells us that’s one of the reasons he is working towards becoming a deacon in his church.

“Professional wrestling can be a very lewd, vulgar, and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things, but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that,” he said.

After winning his first title, one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.”

As he continued to work more dates and shows, he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his trainer should be proud.

On Friday, Moss learned the devastating news.

“Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me,” he tweeted.

Due to a short career, Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who saw and shared his story.

But let’s not diminish the legacy he leaves behind in those he “taught the ropes.”

Just as Matt found purpose training them, they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive.

And while that isn’t always easy, they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught.

It’s just another reason why wrestling is good.

The post Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon appeared first on Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports.

from Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports https://ift.tt/2KBn5by

and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things · and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.'” While training under Cappotteli · “He never yelled · ” he said. After winning his first title · ” he tweeted. Due to a short career · ” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up · but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner ins · but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that · Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds. According to Moss · Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. Wit · Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who · Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would b · Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him t · he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian. As someone of faith · he was pretty nervous. Being older · he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that · he worried whether he’d find his place. And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli. Over the next few months in 2017 · he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his tra · it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves wit · Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38 · Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically · Moss learned the devastating news. “Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me · Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two. “He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood · never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.” Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside · one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.” As he continued to work more dates and shows · they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive. And while that isn’t always easy · they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught. It’s just another reason why wrestling is good. The post Wrestling is Goo · threw my dropkick · vulgar

Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon

Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38, but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner inspired him to become a church deacon.

When Dalton Moss attended Ohio Valley Wrestling’s beginners program as a 28-year-old, he was pretty nervous. Being older, he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that, he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian.

As someone of faith, he worried whether he’d find his place.

And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli.

Over the next few months in 2017, Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would be much more difficult.

Despite the prognosis, Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically, it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves with students. Adding, “He never yelled, never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.”

Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside the ring.  While we can all get caught up in small problems and consumed with negativity, Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds.

According to Moss, Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. With Cappotelli, Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two.

“He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood a lot for the younger guys,” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up, threw my dropkick, and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.’”

While training under Cappotteli, Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him that. Moss tells us that’s one of the reasons he is working towards becoming a deacon in his church.

“Professional wrestling can be a very lewd, vulgar, and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things, but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that,” he said.

After winning his first title, one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.”

As he continued to work more dates and shows, he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his trainer should be proud.

On Friday, Moss learned the devastating news.

“Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me,” he tweeted.

Due to a short career, Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who saw and shared his story.

But let’s not diminish the legacy he leaves behind in those he “taught the ropes.”

Just as Matt found purpose training them, they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive.

And while that isn’t always easy, they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught.

It’s just another reason why wrestling is good.

The post Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon appeared first on Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports.

from Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports https://ift.tt/2KBn5by

and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things · and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.'” While training under Cappotteli · “He never yelled · ” he said. After winning his first title · ” he tweeted. Due to a short career · ” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up · but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner ins · but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that · Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds. According to Moss · Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. Wit · Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who · Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would b · Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him t · he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian. As someone of faith · he was pretty nervous. Being older · he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that · he worried whether he’d find his place. And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli. Over the next few months in 2017 · he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his tra · it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves wit · Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38 · Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically · Moss learned the devastating news. “Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me · Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two. “He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood · never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.” Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside · one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.” As he continued to work more dates and shows · they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive. And while that isn’t always easy · they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught. It’s just another reason why wrestling is good. The post Wrestling is Goo · threw my dropkick · vulgar

Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon

Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38, but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner inspired him to become a church deacon.

When Dalton Moss attended Ohio Valley Wrestling’s beginners program as a 28-year-old, he was pretty nervous. Being older, he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that, he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian.

As someone of faith, he worried whether he’d find his place.

And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli.

Over the next few months in 2017, Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would be much more difficult.

Despite the prognosis, Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically, it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves with students. Adding, “He never yelled, never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.”

Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside the ring.  While we can all get caught up in small problems and consumed with negativity, Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds.

According to Moss, Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. With Cappotelli, Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two.

“He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood a lot for the younger guys,” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up, threw my dropkick, and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.’”

While training under Cappotteli, Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him that. Moss tells us that’s one of the reasons he is working towards becoming a deacon in his church.

“Professional wrestling can be a very lewd, vulgar, and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things, but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that,” he said.

After winning his first title, one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.”

As he continued to work more dates and shows, he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his trainer should be proud.

On Friday, Moss learned the devastating news.

“Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me,” he tweeted.

Due to a short career, Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who saw and shared his story.

But let’s not diminish the legacy he leaves behind in those he “taught the ropes.”

Just as Matt found purpose training them, they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive.

And while that isn’t always easy, they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught.

It’s just another reason why wrestling is good.

The post Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon appeared first on Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports.

from Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports https://ift.tt/2KBn5by

and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things · and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.'” While training under Cappotteli · “He never yelled · ” he said. After winning his first title · ” he tweeted. Due to a short career · ” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up · but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner ins · but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that · Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds. According to Moss · Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. Wit · Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who · Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would b · Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him t · he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian. As someone of faith · he was pretty nervous. Being older · he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that · he worried whether he’d find his place. And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli. Over the next few months in 2017 · he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his tra · it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves wit · Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38 · Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically · Moss learned the devastating news. “Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me · Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two. “He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood · never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.” Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside · one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.” As he continued to work more dates and shows · they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive. And while that isn’t always easy · they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught. It’s just another reason why wrestling is good. The post Wrestling is Goo · threw my dropkick · vulgar

Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon

Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38, but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner inspired him to become a church deacon.

When Dalton Moss attended Ohio Valley Wrestling’s beginners program as a 28-year-old, he was pretty nervous. Being older, he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that, he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian.

As someone of faith, he worried whether he’d find his place.

And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli.

Over the next few months in 2017, Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would be much more difficult.

Despite the prognosis, Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically, it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves with students. Adding, “He never yelled, never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.”

Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside the ring.  While we can all get caught up in small problems and consumed with negativity, Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds.

According to Moss, Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. With Cappotelli, Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two.

“He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood a lot for the younger guys,” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up, threw my dropkick, and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.’”

While training under Cappotteli, Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him that. Moss tells us that’s one of the reasons he is working towards becoming a deacon in his church.

“Professional wrestling can be a very lewd, vulgar, and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things, but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that,” he said.

After winning his first title, one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.”

As he continued to work more dates and shows, he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his trainer should be proud.

On Friday, Moss learned the devastating news.

“Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me,” he tweeted.

Due to a short career, Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who saw and shared his story.

But let’s not diminish the legacy he leaves behind in those he “taught the ropes.”

Just as Matt found purpose training them, they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive.

And while that isn’t always easy, they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught.

It’s just another reason why wrestling is good.

The post Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon appeared first on Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports.

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and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things · and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.'” While training under Cappotteli · “He never yelled · ” he said. After winning his first title · ” he tweeted. Due to a short career · ” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up · but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner ins · but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that · Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds. According to Moss · Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. Wit · Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who · Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would b · Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him t · he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian. As someone of faith · he was pretty nervous. Being older · he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that · he worried whether he’d find his place. And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli. Over the next few months in 2017 · he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his tra · it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves wit · Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38 · Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically · Moss learned the devastating news. “Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me · Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two. “He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood · never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.” Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside · one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.” As he continued to work more dates and shows · they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive. And while that isn’t always easy · they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught. It’s just another reason why wrestling is good. The post Wrestling is Goo · threw my dropkick · vulgar

Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon

Matt Cappotelli sadly passed away this week at the age of 38, but his legacy lives on through family and the students he taught in the ring — including one wrestler who says the “Tough Enough” winner inspired him to become a church deacon.

When Dalton Moss attended Ohio Valley Wrestling’s beginners program as a 28-year-old, he was pretty nervous. Being older, he wasn’t going to be like everyone else in the class. He was a father of three. On top of that, he was anxious over the idea of entering sports entertainment as a Christian.

As someone of faith, he worried whether he’d find his place.

And then he met his trainer: Matt Cappotelli.

Over the next few months in 2017, Cappotelli would face his second bout with brain cancer — he won the first round four years after Tough Enough III — but this time it would be much more difficult.

Despite the prognosis, Matt’s wife said running beginner’s training at OVW helped him have purpose. While he couldn’t do what he once did physically, it was difficult to keep Cappotelli out of the ring. Moss says it wasn’t uncommon for him to run the ropes and walk through various moves with students. Adding, “He never yelled, never got upset. Matt never seemed to let anything bother him.”

Perhaps that’s because he knew life’s greatest challenges took place outside the ring.  While we can all get caught up in small problems and consumed with negativity, Cappotelli chose positivity — even against insurmountable odds.

According to Moss, Cappotelli excelled as a coach and trainer. His demeanor helped eliminate some of Moss’ biggest concerns before venturing into the sport. With Cappotelli, Moss’ age wasn’t a concern; it was an opportunity for a laugh or two.

“He would give me a hard time about being old which lightened the mood a lot for the younger guys,” Moss said. “I remember him commenting on my dropkick. I went nearly last in the drill. I jumped up, threw my dropkick, and he said ‘who would have thought the old bearded guy would have the best dropkick.’”

While training under Cappotteli, Dalton quickly learned there WAS a place for a man of faith in wrestling … despite his initial reservations. And it was Matt who showed him that. Moss tells us that’s one of the reasons he is working towards becoming a deacon in his church.

“Professional wrestling can be a very lewd, vulgar, and hard business. You don’t have to participate in things, but you’ll see and hear things everywhere you go that may not sit well with you. Matt understood that,” he said.

After winning his first title, one of the first things Moss did was text his trainer to say “thanks.”

As he continued to work more dates and shows, he’d share with Matt the many comments he received from promoters who praised his solid fundamentals and foundation. Bookers told him his trainer should be proud.

On Friday, Moss learned the devastating news.

“Glad you finally get to go home. Tell Jesus hello for me,” he tweeted.

Due to a short career, Cappotelli will likely be remembered most for the great courage with which he fought cancer. He battled to the end and inspired everyone who saw and shared his story.

But let’s not diminish the legacy he leaves behind in those he “taught the ropes.”

Just as Matt found purpose training them, they find purpose in keeping his legacy alive.

And while that isn’t always easy, they know how to confront a challenge. It’s how they were taught.

It’s just another reason why wrestling is good.

The post Wrestling is Good: Matt Cappotelli Inspired Religious Student to Become a Deacon appeared first on Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports.

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Recently laid off star gets WWE tryout

WWE had some big names in for a tryout at their Orlando Performance Center this week. We told you about a couple ex-Impact stars. The company’s website has a full official list, including Rob “Robbie E” Strauss, Chelsea “Laurel Van Ness” Green, Rory Gulak and collegiate heavyweight wrestling champion Jacob Kasper, here.

But Triple H brought in an even bigger (literal and figurative) star. With the closing of the last Toys ‘R’ Us stores in the U.S. on Fri., June 29, their iconic mascot Geoffrey the giraffe is available, and The Game decided to give him a look:

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With size Vince McMahon will love, expect Geoffrey to bypass NXT and head right up to the main roster for a feud with Braun Strowman.

Now, I wonder what his WWE name will be…

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Have 2 tickets for the G1 USA special to sell

Apologies if this isn't allowed since I'm new to the sub, but I have held a couple tickets for a friend of mine and he seems like he's about to flake on me. They're in section D, 3rd row. $200 face value, I'll eat the extra Ticketmaster costs, an even $400 for both.

They're physical copies, so I'd either have to mail them out ASAP or I can meet you at Cow Palace with them. I'm still going, I just refreshed and found front row and jumped on those.

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WWE Stock Report: Roman’s main event status needs a Revival

Some places do power rankings. Here at Cageside, we do a stock report.

In this weekly series from our video dream team of Cain A. Knight and Stephanie Hatala, we’ve got three Superstars (or teams of Superstars) who are on their way up, and three that are moving in the opposite direction. And after a week which saw the main event of Extreme Rules change, a long simmering feud heat up and a shake-up in the blue brand tag ranks due to a debut and a (somewhat) unexpected reunion, a lot of fortunes were changed.

Check it out and see if you agree with their picks:

Stock Down

3. Roman Reigns
2. Kurt Angle
1. SAniY

Stock Up

3. The Revival
2. Bayley
1. Team Hell No

And if you enjoy this video, remember to like our Facebook page and subscribe to our YouTube channel, where Cain and Stephanie are producing great stuff like this all the time!

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Not Your Demographic, Ep. 136: Don’t @ us. Pay us.

This week, Enigma Erin wants you to stop talking to her about Ronda Rousey. Stunning Stella just wants you to stop talking to her (jk).

Things they are into this week:

  • GLOW
  • Joe Coffey
  • Alicia’s wig
  • oh, and a little thing called BAYLEY HEEL TURN

Listen:

Patreon: NotYourDemoPod
Twitter: @Stella_Cheeks, @ErnGenC
Tumblr: Not Your Demographic
iTunes: Please rate and review

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Kenny Omega responds to fan complaints he booked a sex offender on CEO x NJPW show

While Jim Cornette may find himself upset over the main event of the CEO x NJPW: When Worlds Collide event featuring stuffed animals and what not, other fans of professional wrestling are upset about one wrestler getting booked on the show at all.

Chasyn Rance, a registered sex offender, defeated Aaron Epic in the first dark match of the evening. Fans then took to Twitter to question Kenny Omega about the decision to have such a match on the show. His response:

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That is very much the response of someone who didn’t use anyone in public relations to help craft it and it has, unsurprisingly, resulted in even more criticism. Whether or not Rance was polite to Omega does not mean he isn’t a registered sex offender, and the fact that Omega didn’t feel like he was working with a criminal does not mean he wasn’t. He quite literally was.

The statement fails to make clear whether or not Omega knew of Rance’s history but implies that he did not, which would be a failure in vetting the talent used on his show. At the very least, he does say he will only use those he’s “absolutely familiar/comfortable with” going forward.

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and various odd jobs around the arena. I’d felt giving them the opportunity to have a dark match was the least I could do as a way to show ap · but at no point did I feel I was working with criminals or anything of the sort. As I’d said earlier · Chasyn Rance — a convicted sex offender — wrestled in the opening match of NJPW‘s event at a popular gaming convention on Friday night and Ke · no name graphics. And thus they had a match. I met Chasyn once in 2004 so his name was familiar. The other guy I’d never met. Regardless of t · Omega or a CEO official.  The post Kenny Omega Comments on Allowing Sex Offender to Wrestle at CEOxNJPW Event appeared first on Pro Wrestlin · Rance was convicted of lewd and lascivious sex with a minor in 2011. A simple Google search shows the indie wrestler can be found on sex offe · tear down · they were nothing but polite and helpful throughout the entire experience. I’ll know better for next time to only use those I’m absolutely fa · this crew of people were all very helpful in set up · which kicked off with a match between Rance and Aaron Epic. For those unfamiliar

Kenny Omega Comments on Allowing Sex Offender to Wrestle at CEOxNJPW Event

Chasyn Rance — a convicted sex offender — wrestled in the opening match of NJPW‘s event at a popular gaming convention on Friday night and Kenny Omega has now commented on the matter.

The NJPW event in Florida took place at the CEO ’18 Fighting Game Championships and Omega was in charge of the actual wrestling show, which kicked off with a match between Rance and Aaron Epic.

For those unfamiliar, Rance was convicted of lewd and lascivious sex with a minor in 2011. A simple Google search shows the indie wrestler can be found on sex offender registries.

Kenny responded to the negative reaction on Twitter this morning saying:

“Here it is: I produced all matches from dark match #2 on. I gave the ring crew (also a wrestling school) carte Blanche to have our first dark. No entrances,no name graphics. And thus they had a match. I met Chasyn once in 2004 so his name was familiar. The other guy I’d never met. Regardless of their history or whatever, this crew of people were all very helpful in set up, tear down, and various odd jobs around the arena. I’d felt giving them the opportunity to have a dark match was the least I could do as a way to show appreciation. I’m gutted that people feel betrayed by their involvement, but at no point did I feel I was working with criminals or anything of the sort. As I’d said earlier, they were nothing but polite and helpful throughout the entire experience. I’ll know better for next time to only use those I’m absolutely familiar/comfortable with.”

It’s unclear who first contacted the school run by Rance to be involved, Omega or a CEO official. 

The post Kenny Omega Comments on Allowing Sex Offender to Wrestle at CEOxNJPW Event appeared first on Pro Wrestling Sheet | Insider Wrestling News and Reports.

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Report says Lesnar might not return to WWE ‘until later in the year’

WWE’s made their Universal Champion’s infrequent appearances, contractual status and desire to return to UFC part of their storylines. As a result, even more than everything else in the ‘Reality’ Era of 2018, it can be difficult to tell what’s real and what Vince McMahon and team want us to believe is real about Brock Lesnar.

The online work Paul Heyman did last weekend, and the on-screen rebooking of Extreme Rules it led to on the June 25 episode of Raw, make it clear the fictional story is that Lesnar is holding the company hostage. Is that because he’s really out of dates and wants a bigger payday for one more to drop the belt? Because Vince is still trying to get Roman Reigns cheered? A wave of indecisiveness in creative after they allegedly changed plans away from having Reigns win at WrestleMania 34?

That much is unclear. But as our Rumor Roundup feature covered in its Friday edition, there’s real doubt about whether the red brand’s top titleholder will work the second/third biggest show of the year, August’s SummerSlam.

Another report is now backing that up, and suggesting it might be even longer before we see The Beast Incarnate and the championship he hold. On a recent PWInsider Elite Audio show (subscription required; transcription here via WrestleZone), Mike Johnson said:

“I’m hearing that Brock isn’t working SummerSlam. We may not see him again until later in the year which is madness, if you think about the belt.”

With WWE Network, The E’s shown a willingness to make big matches on non-Big 4 shows, so it’s possible a major moment like a Universal Title change could happen somewhere like Hell in a Cell. With the television shows being the most valuable thing in Vince’s toy box these days, it’s even conceivable they could put a Lesnar match on Raw – although the fact Brock’s not wrestled on TV in years makes that seem unlikely.

No matter, since signs keep pointing to it being a long time before we see him again. We could have plenty of time to think about his next appearance, and the fate of the red belt.

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